Labfolder https://www.labfolder.com free electronic lab notebook Wed, 09 Mar 2022 10:31:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://www.labfolder.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/cropped-lf-favicon-32x32.png Labfolder https://www.labfolder.com 32 32 Introducing our New & Improved Grid Layout Feature https://www.labfolder.com/grid-layout-update/ https://www.labfolder.com/grid-layout-update/#comments Mon, 07 Mar 2022 13:01:44 +0000 https://www.labfolder.com/?p=50099   When designing our electronic lab notebook (ELN), one of the most important things we aim to achieve is to ensure that our users have as much flexibility as possible so they can tailor Labfolder to meet their specific research requirements and personal preferences. That’s why today we are thrilled to announce that we’ve released […]

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When designing our electronic lab notebook (ELN), one of the most important things we aim to achieve is to ensure that our users have as much flexibility as possible so they can tailor Labfolder to meet their specific research requirements and personal preferences. That’s why today we are thrilled to announce that we’ve released an update to our grid layout feature. We now allow users to input up to twelve resizable and movable elements next to each other within their Labfolder entries. This updated feature facilitates data entry and project organization, giving our users maximum control over the appearance of their entries within our ELN.

Before, it was only possible to have two entries side by side, now the maximum is twelve, giving our users the ability to customize their entries as they see fit. Noticeably, this feature also allows users to freely move and modify the sizes of the elements within an entry. A click will add the element to the bottom of the entry, if there is still space on the previous row it will go next to the last element created. Simply adjust the element size, then drag and drop the elements into the desired location. In this way, our grid layout feature streamlines data documentation, giving more options to our users.

Take a look at how easy it is to do!

 

Improved grid feature allows you to input up to twelve resizable elements next to one another

 

We aim for our platform to provide scientists with the best possible experience, with not only robust features that facilitate standardization and compliance, but also features that give our users the ability to get creative and store their research documentation however they wish. As always, we’re keen to hear our customer’s feedback, so please feel free to submit your thoughts or ideas to feedback@labfolder.com.

 

Try it in Labfolder

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Simplify the way you connect materials to each other and to your lab notes https://www.labfolder.com/inventory-relationships/ https://www.labfolder.com/inventory-relationships/#respond Mon, 20 Dec 2021 11:52:23 +0000 https://www.labfolder.com/?p=49481   Common table editors have been serving researchers for a long time in managing lab inventories. Often, the given functionalities do not suffice in handling the complex requirements of material documentation. Labregister has taken an alternative approach, and with its new material item overview, its capabilities are growing. Research laboratories can only work efficiently if […]

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Common table editors have been serving researchers for a long time in managing lab inventories. Often, the given functionalities do not suffice in handling the complex requirements of material documentation. Labregister has taken an alternative approach, and with its new material item overview, its capabilities are growing.

Research laboratories can only work efficiently if the availability of stocks and reagents can be guaranteed. Therefore, many scientists fall back on sheets of tables to track and maintain their materials. Unfortunately, this format falls short of providing the full picture lab managers require when listing important material inventory. Additional tracking of modifications, attachment of important purchasing information or data sheets as well as the reflection of complex relationships between materials, to mention just a few, are things that would benefit the lab personnel greatly.

The Labregister inventory manager substitutes simple listings and provides clear advantages through its direct integration to the laboratory notebook, simplifying material referencing. Tailored towards scientific requirements, additional file attachment, relationship and references attributes are designed to assist laboratory teams further.

 

Use Labregister to display chemical reactions

 

The newly released relationship attribute enables scientists to link multiple inventory items to each other and define a parent or child relationship as appropriate. In the example of a simple chemical reaction to produce Acetylsalicylic Acid (Aspirin), the reactants Salicylic acid and Acetic Anhydride will be defined as ‘children’ relative to the Aspirin product – represented as the ‘parent’ in Labregister.
By translating this to the broader concept, researchers can ensure quality standards through full traceability of their materials.

The concerted use of the Labfolder electronic lab notebook and the Labregister inventory manager facilitates complete research documentation. Experiment planning, execution and results can be recorded, including all used materials and reagents. By referencing materials with an appropriate link to Labregister, the individual material specifications can be directly accessed. Within the material item overview, users are able to retrieve relevant documents and relationships. Moreover, the references tab lists comparable data entries within Labfolder where the specific item has also been used.

 


 
Connect materials and lab notes


 

 

Overall, Labregister’s new item view enables scientists to comprehensively list laboratory stocks and reagents. To establish better insights into the material life cycle, users can track which experiments have been performed with an inventory item and also access related materials. The display of created and last modified dates in the inventory categories provides additional traceability. In this manner, using digital solutions advances the current way of working through additional capabilities specifically for scientific use.

 

Try it for your team

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Setting the Standard: FAIR & ALCOA+ in research during the pandemic https://www.labfolder.com/fair-alcoa-and-the-pandemic/ https://www.labfolder.com/fair-alcoa-and-the-pandemic/#respond Tue, 07 Dec 2021 14:30:54 +0000 https://www.labfolder.com/?p=49452 Ever wondered how the FAIR and ALCOA + principles have helped scientists during the pandemic? In this blog, we delve into what these principles are and how they’ve acted as a guide to ensure data integrity and accuracy of research. The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted to the world the importance of science, challenging our vaccine response […]

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Ever wondered how the FAIR and ALCOA + principles have helped scientists during the pandemic? In this blog, we delve into what these principles are and how they’ve acted as a guide to ensure data integrity and accuracy of research.

The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted to the world the importance of science, challenging our vaccine response rate and research and development (R&D) data infrastructures. The pandemic created a need for a wide range of data to be collected, collated, and analyzed both quickly and efficiently. The speed in capturing data on the virus and then producing valuable research which helped us combat its spread was in part facilitated by the FAIR and ALCOA+ guidelines, which ensured that the research was compliant, accurate, and could be replicated.

Making the pandemic related data compliant and in accordance with FAIR and ALCOA+ principles has also meant that the data is accessible to both machines and humans, which has not only perhaps improved the speed of the response to the pandemic, but also helped us prepare for the long term changes in research and development with increasing machine and Internet of Things(IoT) integration.

What are the key features of FAIR?

FAIR principles were introduced in 2014 in response to the rapidly changing technological environment that stimulated a shift in both the rate and volume of the production of research data. As a result of this shift, FAIR principles were created to set a standard for scientific research to increase the reusability of data. FAIR principles are designed to facilitate the reuse of research data to make it more readily accessible for both humans and machines.

Findable

> Both people and computers should be able to find your data or metadata related to your research with ease. This is one of the most important components of the process, as this ensures the automatic findability of datasets.

Accessible

> Data must be stored in a manner where it is openly available, this does not implicitly mean that in all cases data must be ‘Open’, rather it outlines the conditions where this data is accessible. This includes an explanation of where the data, associated metadata, documentation, and code are deposited and how this can be accessed with potential authentication or authorization.

Interoperable

> Data must be structured in a way where it can be combined with other data sets. Data must be described in a standard way, using accepted metadata standards, and needs to interoperate with applications or workflows for storage, processing, and analysis. This allows the data to be ‘machine-actionable’ in order for values of attributes to be scrutinized across a range of data sets to ensure they are being measured and represented in the same way. Ultimately, the interoperability component of FAIR is an essential feature that upholds the value and usability of data.

Reusable

> The researcher should make sure that the data is reusable by detailing the quality assurance procedures alongside documenting the data licensed. Data and metadata should therefore be described thoroughly so it can be replicated or used in different settings.

What are the ALCOA + principles?

Medicine regulatory systems across the world depend on the knowledge of the organizations that develop, manufacture and package, test, distribute and monitor pharmaceutical products.
Therefore there is a certain degree of trust between the regulatory bodies and the pharmaceutical companies that the information submitted and used in decision making is both complete and reliable. Ultimately, the data that forms the basis of decisions should therefore be attributable, legible, contemporaneous, original, and accurate. These principles were put together and formed the acronym for the five main principles of data integrity, commonly referred to as “ALCOA”.

Attributable

> Information must be captured in a way where it is uniquely identified by the originator of the data (e.g. person or computer).

Legible

> Information must be recorded in a way where it can be easily deciphered, understood, allowing a complete and clear picture of the sequencing of steps or events in the record.

Contemporaneous

> Data must be recorded at the time it was generated or observed.

Original

> Data must include the first or source capture of data or information and all subsequent data required in order to fully reconstruct the activity required.

Accurate

> Data must be correct, truthful, complete, valid and reliable.

These principles were later updated however to include four new additions, changing the term to ALCOA +.

  • Complete: All data must be included. This does not exclude any repeat or reanalysis performed on the sample.
  • Consistent: All elements must be time stamped correctly and in chronological order.
  • Enduring: All recordings and notes must be accessible over an extended period.
  • Available: All data be accessed for review over the lifetime of the record

How do they compare?

Whilst the FAIR principles focus predominantly on the infrastructure for data, placing a large emphasis on metadata, conversely the ALCOA+ principles focus on data integrity issues, this makes it especially important for benchwork scientists. If the ALCOA+ principles are adhered to, it increases the trustworthiness of the data and subsequently makes research integrity easier to uphold. However, crucially, managing these attributes within electronic systems requires FAIR principles to be considered and implemented, to ensure that data and metadata are stored appropriately and data is readily accessible to uphold Horizon 2020’s open data aims.

How did ALCOA+ & FAIR help in the pandemic?

The pandemic has created an unprecedented need for researchers to act quickly in order to tackle the SARS-Cov-2 virus. Everything from documenting and processing samples, establishing its origin, individual susceptibility due to DNA, to developing vaccinations and identifying mutations requires the practices of open research and responsible data sharing to be upheld. ALCOA+ has helped set the highest of standards for data integrity and as official guidance produced by the WHO, it has become increasingly important that data scientists and AI researchers working on COVID-19 adhere to demands of data integrity practices. In addition, it is equally important that research refers to the FAIR criteria for responsible data management, to not only ensure that scientists adopt the best practices for storing and sharing their research data, but also to enable and stimulate further collaboration within scientific communities globally.

How can an ELN help?

Electronic Lab Notebooks (ELN’s) like Labfolder are designed to encourage both the ALCOA+ and FAIR principles. With features that facilitate data integrity and management, the digitization of scientific processes through software has helped researchers follow both the ALCOA+ and FAIR guidelines. This is because ELNs contribute to both reproducibility and reusability of data, alongside ensuring that research can be easily accessed and retrieved. Digital tools also make it easier to ensure data integrity with the oversight of metadata in an ELN; the entire experiment can be recorded from the planning stages to the results. Increasingly, researchers are looking for digital solutions, not only to set the foundations for long-term plans to connect the laboratory but also as a way to improve complex processes and make things more efficient and simpler for those working in research and development.

To find out more about Labfolder and how it can help your lab please:

Request a demo

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Introducing the New and Improved Labfolder User Interface https://www.labfolder.com/new-labfolder-interface/ https://www.labfolder.com/new-labfolder-interface/#respond Tue, 30 Nov 2021 10:23:16 +0000 https://www.labfolder.com/?p=48889   Making the switch from paper to digital can be simplified if the electronic lab notebook has an intuitive, organized interface. Therefore, it is our top priority to ensure that every customer has a great experience when using our electronic lab notebook (ELN). We are always looking for ways to continually improve our product and […]

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Making the switch from paper to digital can be simplified if the electronic lab notebook has an intuitive, organized interface. Therefore, it is our top priority to ensure that every customer has a great experience when using our electronic lab notebook (ELN). We are always looking for ways to continually improve our product and make it more user-friendly and fun to use. Today, we are thrilled to announce the release of our new and improved user interface, created to facilitate data entry and project organization, maximize user productivity and ensure our user experience is consistent across all Labforward products.

When designing the new user interface we took into consideration the feedback from our customers. We removed the light square background that people weren’t fond of and ensured that the new header design is spacious to provide a clear overview of the respective data entry. Just take a look at the before (pictured left) and after pictures and you’ll see the vast improvement!

 

Labfolder Electronic Lab Notebook before and after User Interface changes

 

Complete with a refreshing design, this new look is not only far more clear and pleasing on the eye, but it is also consistent with the designs of our other products, Laboperator and Labregister. The new product panel (pictured below), for instance, allows our customers to seamlessly navigate through all of our platforms and explore everything Labforward has to offer.

And that’s not all! Working in research and development demands flexibility in ways in which research can be documented. That’s why in this release, we have worked to significantly improve the mobile compatibility of our ELN. Now Labfolder has increased responsiveness when accessed from mobile devices, for example, you can simply upload images directly from your phone!

 


 
Labfolder ELN viewed from a phone and tablet


 

 

We aim for our platform to provide scientists with the best possible experience and facilitate research documentation. As always, we’re keen to hear our customer’s feedback, so feel free to submit thoughts or ideas to feedback@labfolder.com.

Open Labfolder now, to explore all this recent update has to offer!

Login to Labfolder

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The annual iGEM competition is back and once again it’s pushing the boundaries of Synthetic Biology https://www.labfolder.com/labfolder-at-igem/ https://www.labfolder.com/labfolder-at-igem/#respond Thu, 25 Nov 2021 15:38:09 +0000 https://www.labfolder.com/?p=48802 The International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization whose goal is to promote the field of synthetic biology. What teams are competing this year? This year we have again made our Labfolder ELN (Electronic Lab Notebook) available for free to any team competing in iGEM that would like to avail of […]

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The International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Foundation is an independent, non-profit organization whose goal is to promote the field of synthetic biology.

The annual iGEM Competition is a worldwide event that aims to challenge the boundaries of synthetic biology. The competition is tailored towards undergraduate university students, as well as high school and graduate students who will compete in the event to develop projects that address real-world issues. Students work together to build, test, and measure a system of their own design, using standard molecular biology techniques and interchangeable biological parts.

iGEM provides students with the resources to develop bio-compatible systems that can be operated in living cells. Its main goal is to promote an open, cooperative community and to encourage student collaboration throughout the competition.

iGEM logo

What teams are competing this year?

This year we have again made our Labfolder ELN (Electronic Lab Notebook) available for free to any team competing in iGEM that would like to avail of it. We spoke with two of these teams TU Kaiserslautern and Philipps-Universität Marburg about their experiences at iGEM 2021.

As usual, the iGEM teams are pushing the limits of synthetic biology and striving to create positive change for not only their communities but for the world at large. Throughout the competition, these young scientists have gained valuable knowledge of working in a lab and experienced the importance of operating efficiently as a team. By having the opportunity to use Labfolder one of the key features that stood out as most beneficial was of course the ease of collaborating as a team. Having all group findings documented in one place instead of spread across multiple journals made keeping everyone up to date and sharing work simple. Not only this but having the ability to access lab notes on the go via tablet or mobile phone meant that no time was wasted sifting through paper notebooks or having to check with colleagues when cross-referencing information.

Continue reading to find out how TU Kaiserslautern and Philipps-Universität Marburg incorporated Labfolder into their workflow and learn more about what their projects encompass.

Get Labfolder for your iGEM team today

Could you tell us a bit about your project and what you find exciting about it?

TU Kaiserslautern

“Our project, MoClo Mania, is very exciting for us. We are trying to establish the Modular Cloning system in Leishmania tarentolae, we have to work with the Cloning system a lot, which includes, designing basic parts, PCRs, cloning, restriction digest and many more. The second component to the project, Leishmania tarentolae includes cell culturing methods, transfection as well as protein detection and purification. This gives us, as young scientists the opportunity to learn many new methods and get a large skillset.”

Philipps-Universität Marburg

“For our project, Open Plast, Our team has set itself the task of reducing the development time for new improved crops. To this end, we have developed so-called cell-free systems. These allow genetic building blocks to be tested – without having to bring the DNA into a living cell.

We have specialized in systems of chloroplasts, which are responsible for photosynthesis in plants, as these would offer various advantages for the final application in crops, such as the fact that the genetic changes in the chloroplast are not transferred by pollen. To obtain these cell-free systems, we have isolated chloroplasts from various plants over the course of our project, such as spinach, the important crop wheat – and even leaves of oak.

By performing a multiple-day isolation protocol in the lab we obtained the biochemical machinery of the chloroplasts. This could then be used to test genetic elements in a test tube. This cell-free approach could rapidly accelerate the development of new crops in the future, as many tests can be performed simultaneously and on a large scale before a living plant is modified.”

How have you found your experience competing in iGEM, is there a highlight of the competition that stands out for you or your team?

TU Kaiserslautern

“Competing in iGEM brought up many challenges for us, which with the help of our advisors we were able to manage. We as a team grew together while facing those challenges and also grew as persons ourselves… There is not a single event we can point out as a highlight but the whole experience itself.”

Philipps-Universität Marburg

“One highlight of the competition was the incredible amount of results we got from our lab work. By the end of the iGEM competition we were able to get systems running we hadn’t even dared to dream of, like the improvement of genetic parts in oak and wheat extracts. Therefore, we were able to prove that the concept of our cell-free systems is working and conferrable into the real world.

In the end, all our hard work and dedication we put into our project has led us to not just win a gold medal, but the Grand Prize in the overgrad category in iGEM!”

In your experience, has Labfolder helped your team work more efficiently throughout iGEM?

TU Kaiserslautern

“Using an electronic notebook is very helpful to keep all the notes in one place, where everyone can access it at all times, which saved us a lot of time which we would have spent on communicating or finding paper notes.”

Philipps-Universität Marburg

“Labfolder was our source number one when we needed to repeat a certain workflow in the lab. As there were many different people working in the lab on the same topic, we
highlighted the regular use of this virtual laboratory journal a lot. Details of our workflow,
written down in Labfolder, helped us to continuously improve our lab work, doing
troubleshooting and easing the internal communication a lot. Every team member had access to the project in Labfolder, even via mobile phone which enabled quick rechecks…”

How has your team used Labfolder throughout the competition, which functionalities did you find the most useful?

Philipps-Universität Marburg

“For our team, Labfolder has been an integral part of our workflow in the lab. At the end of every single day in the lab, entries had to be written to note down our progress, but most importantly to keep every team member always up to date. We have used Labfolder as a virtual laboratory journal which is a huge improvement compared to the regularly used paperback journals. Instead of having many separate lab journals… all notes were collected in one project. This gave us the advantage of having all laboratory entries in one place.

The most useful functionalities were definitely the tag-function which made it a lot easier to find certain entries later on… instead of writing down the same protocol all over again we simply referenced it and just wrote down the changes we did… saving a lot of precious time in the last few hours of the competition.”

Why Labfolder wants to be involved?

Lanfolder blue logo

At Labforward we believe that the future of scientific research is in the digital realm, and we are committed to helping scientists become more productive with Labfolder ELN.
As collaboration is such an important aspect of the iGEM competition, Labfolder is an ideal solution. Traditional paper notebooks are nearly impossible to use efficiently, with our ELN collaboration within a team is made easy.

“Using Labfolder enables laboratories to move forward faster: Instead of writing down every observation on paper, the laboratory journal entries are accessible virtually, making working on the same project by many different persons – like in our iGEM team – a lot easier. “

–Tamina Kirsch, Philipps-Universität Marburg

With this in mind, we will continue to provide our Labfolder ELN for free to any teams participating in iGEM in the future. We will also gladly set each team up with one of our experts who will ensure they learn about digital research data documentation and management with the help of Labfolder.

If you or your university are competing in iGEM and are interested in being sponsored by Labforward please get in touch with us and we would be happy to set your team up for the competition.

Contact us today for free access to our Labfolder ELN

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Lesson learnt: Rising numbers of women in STEM https://www.labfolder.com/women-in-stem/ https://www.labfolder.com/women-in-stem/#respond Mon, 06 Sep 2021 12:54:26 +0000 https://www.labfolder.com/?p=48245 Female scientists are currently at the forefront of many groundbreaking research projects across the globe and despite there still being a long way to go to reach total gender parity, research shows that more women than ever are starting careers in science and technology. Yet barriers still exist for women in STEM and tackling gender […]

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Female scientists are currently at the forefront of many groundbreaking research projects across the globe and despite there still being a long way to go to reach total gender parity, research shows that more women than ever are starting careers in science and technology. Yet barriers still exist for women in STEM and tackling gender stereotypes by accentuating the work of female researchers and engineers is a key step to ensuring that more young women take the initiative to pursue a career in science and technology.

Historically, women have always played a big role in science and in particular, the development of technology. You’ll most likely have heard of Ada Lovelace, Henrietta Vansittart and Hertha Ayrton who have shaped the world today with their technological discoveries. Yet there has always been a disparity in the numbers of women pursuing careers in STEM, compared to men.

 

What the current data says

A 2018 OECD report disclosed that women are “significantly less likely to choose natural sciences, engineering and ICT studies”. Whilst numbers have consistently improved since the start of the 21st century, there still seems to be a long way to go, particularly in subjects such as computing and engineering. However, there are many signs of positive change in the OECD data, particularly in emerging economies such as India and Indonesia, the nations closest to achieving gender parity.

Similarly, a recent study launched by Ludo Waltman from Leiden University investigated the levels of women starting a career in science, looking at the differences by discipline between the years 2000 and 2010. Uptake of medicine, neuroscience and agricultural and biological sciences increased significantly alongside a rise in all other fields bar nursing, which saw a decrease. The study paints a positive outlook for women starting careers in science, whilst the numbers are not equal yet, more and more women are being incentivized to pursue careers in STEM subjects.

During the pandemic, female researchers have played a vital role in combating the spread and efficacy of the virus. From important research on the makeup of COVID-19 to designing tests to creating suitable PPE for doctors and nurses, to developing vaccines; the pandemic has demonstrated that women are increasingly at the forefront of scientific research.

Remarkable women in science today

More than ever before, young girls are being encouraged to be inquisitive about the world around them and pursue careers in science and technology. In August, it was announced that Barbie had created a doll of the female scientist who designed the Oxford coronavirus vaccine, Prof Dame Sarah Gilbert. Her wish, she said, “is that my doll will show children careers they may not be aware of, like a vaccinologist”. Prof Dame Gilbert’s doll is one of six to honour women working in STEM. The overarching aim of the collection is to challenge gender stereotypes and show young people that heroes come in many different forms.

Today, some of the most important discoveries and advances in science have been attributed to women. Alongside Prof Dame Gilbert, there is Jennifer Doudna, Cynthia Kenyon, Katherine Freese, Sunetra Gupta and Nina Tandon, who are progressing science with their groundbreaking research.

Jennifer Doudna

The inventor of a technology for editing genomes, CRISPR-Cas9, Jennifer Doudna is one of the most well-known scientists of the modern age. Jennifer Doudna earned a Ph.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1989. She later received the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2020 alongside Emmanuelle Charpentier for the development of a method for genome editing.


Nina Tandon

Nina Tandon is a biomedical engineer who is changing the world of cell science. She is the founder and CEO of EpiBone, a company that grows bones for skeletal reconstruction. She has completed two advanced degrees at Columbia University: a Ph.D. and postdoc in stem cells and tissue engineering and an Executive MBA in healthcare entrepreneurship.


Cynthia Kenyon

A molecular biologist whose work on genetics could help us understand and slow the effects of aging so we can live longer, healthier lives. She is currently the vice president of aging research at Calico Research Labs, and emeritus professor of biochemistry and biophysics at the University of California in San Francisco.


Sunetra Gupta

Sunetra Gupta is a professor of Theoretical Epidemiology at the University of Oxford. Gupta’s research focuses on the infectious disease agents that are responsible for HIV, malaria, bacterial meningitis, influenza and COVID-19. During the pandemic, Gupta was prominent in voicing her opinion over containment strategies.


Katherine Freese

Katherine Freese is a theoretical astrophysicist. Currently a professor of physics at the University of Texas at Austin, she is also the author of “The Cosmic Cocktail,”. She is most known for her work in theoretical cosmology at the interface of particle physics and astrophysics.


Our team’s experiences

Many employees at Labforward have a background in STEM. As of today, 37% of Labforward employees are women. We spoke to a couple of our colleagues to ascertain why they decided to do science at higher education and what their experiences were in the lab.

For Melanie, her experiences in the lab shaped her as an individual. Inspired by her biology teachers, she went on to study Biomedicine at higher education. Speaking of her experiences she said: “I liked the work in the laboratory as it requires you to be a perfectionist, be good with your hands and of course, know your topic well. It also needs a lot of patience as many experiments do not work out as planned. Troubleshooting is on the daily agenda and one needs to become resilient to disappointments. Nevertheless, it’s a beautiful place to work as you will discover things on a daily basis that no one saw before.”

Likewise, Frances had always been passionate about natural sciences; she joined extracurricular science activities where she could, and showed great enthusiasm for STEM courses throughout her education. She studied biotechnology at university and remarked how as the “course content got significantly more challenging,”-her-“passion remained and resulted in a higher degree”. Speaking of her experiences, she states that: “working in the laboratory fulfilled me very much, and while I was always treated with respect and equal to my (male) colleagues some of my fellow female researchers were not so lucky. Now, many universities employ ‘women in science’ initiatives and encourage women to demand equality. It’s been great to see how fruitful these initiatives are”. After studying a STEM subject at university, she carries the valuable experiences from the laboratory forward and it continues to influence her daily life.

Key take aways

Whether a woman decides to stay working in the STEM environment or whether they choose to pursue a different career, the skills and experiences they’ve made in the lab continue to shape them. Frances and Melanie for example have chosen to use their background to aid other scientists by connecting the laboratory environment. Whilst there’s always more we can do to encourage women to pursue careers in STEM, the numbers are promising as they demonstrate that women in science initiatives are working and more than ever before women are choosing to do a STEM subject at higher education.

 

“Science is not a boy’s game, it’s not a girl’s game. It’s everyone’s game. It’s about where we are and where we’re going.”

– Nichelle Nichols, Former NASA Ambassador and Actress

 

Take your research to the next level with free ELN access

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